FYI – Yahoo! Games I’m still disappointed

Saturday my pictures was blogged on Yahoo! Games. I was flattered that they liked my work, but such a big company ought to know somethings about legal deeds. I thought they did. I thought the knew all about rights when they asked me to AGREE with there terms, on thursday, but I didn’t replay so they went a head and published my work anyway.

I publish my work under a Creative Commons license to make it clear how I want to share my work.

So when it came to my notice that Yahoo had published my work I thought they had done that under the Creative Commons licenses I have choosen, but on there blog it said nothing about Creative Commons, noting about the terms I share my work under. I was stunned, what should I do? Just be flattered, or should I shout out my anger, ask for my rights?

I went for the latter, I wrote a blog post, I sent an e-mail to Yahoo! and told them that I didn’t agree with there terms, and that I thought they had violated the terms under which I published my work, I told them that I share my work under a Creative Commons license so I asked Yahoo to (from my email):

 please tell your community that my pictures are available under Creative Commons and the license. And Please tell your community that you missed that little bit of information when you published my work, and then follow the terms.

What happened? What did Yahoo! Games do?

They replied that they would take down the pictures and that they would:

inform our community as you requested

They took down the pictures, but they seems to have missed some part of my request, the part about Creative Commons, when they wrote this in connection to the black box:

per the author’s request, these images have been taken off, but you can see them on the author’s Flickr stream here:


Where did the part of Creative Commons go? Did you miss that part Yahoo? Why didn’t Yahoo tell there community that I share my work under a Creative Commons license?

Why CClones? – Why not Troopers, or just Clones…

My photo-project with still life started with me borrowing my sons Clone-troopers toys. I wanted to make pictures of toys that we could share on the Internet. And for those who know me, they know that Creative Commons is near to my heart. So when I was naming the project it was natural to call it CClones. The name CClones were CC stands for Creative Commons is my way to contribute to the idea of Creative Commons and to tell the world that I believe in the idea of sharing.

I believe in Creative Commons because I think it’s important that the culture, the knowledge, the science that we explore and create today, is available to those who lives today. I think it’s important that our knowledge, our culture is free, or at least can be shared freely. I don’t think that we have anything to gain be locking in our knowledge, and I believe in the Internet and the potential of using Internet to sharing what we create. Creative Commons makes this possible.

I share my work under Creative Commons licenses. And that is why my work with troopers, is called CClones, and not clones, or just troopers.